Code of Ethics

Ethics is something we take seriously.

We’ve spent a lot of time developing our code of ethics.

It gives our facilitators and coaches confidence in working with The NatureProcess.

It gives those they work with confidence in using The NatureProcess.

We are proud that our code of ethics has received the International Association for Coaches, Mentors and Therapists (IACTM) stamp of approval.

The NatureProcess Code of Ethics

  1. The NatureProcess (TNP) facilitators’ and coaches’ root principle is to consider, first and foremost, the physical, emotional, mental, social, financial, spiritual and environmental well-being of their client along with any others whom they have a professional relationship.
  2. TNP facilitators and coaches have a lifelong commitment to personal and transpersonal development of self.
  3. TNP facilitators and coaches accept responsibility for their behaviour and uphold professional standards of conduct.
  4. TNP facilitators and coaches promote honesty, integrity and transparency in all of their communications and in the practice of teaching, facilitating and coaching TNP.
  5. TNP facilitators and coaches keep their agreements and avoid making unrealistic or unclear commitments.
  6. In the event of illness, stress or any other factors that may interfere with the facilitator or coach competently working with clients, the practitioner cancels or postpones the activity until the limiting factors have been resolved.
  7. TNP facilitators and coaches take reasonable precautions to ensure their personal biases, the boundaries of their competence, impairments to their own health and well-being, and the limitations of their expertise do not negatively impact the services they provide to their clients.
  8. TNP facilitators and coaches respect the rights, value and individuality of all people along with their rights to privacy and confidentiality.
  9. TNP facilitators and coaches are committed to giving all person’s access to and benefit from TNP while ensuring they maintain their integrity and personal safety at all times.
  10. TNP facilitators and coaches are aware of, respect, and accommodate individual, cultural, and role differences, including those based on age, gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, culture, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, language, social and financial status.
  11. TNP facilitators and coaches demonstrate a personal commitment to acting ethically; modelling ethical behaviour, encouraging ethical behaviour and consulting with others concerning ethical problems.
TNP is a “holistic” approach to well-being based on the principle that humans and nature are intimately entwined. Facilitators and coaches understand that TNP offers a way of relating to life as well as mastery of specific concepts and techniques.

With this awareness, TNP facilitators and coaches are committed to developing their ongoing relationship with nature, to living in a more nature-centred way, and to the continued development of their own self.

The more our facilitators and coaches have focused on their own growth and development, the more proficient they are as facilitators and coaches of TNP and the more likely they are to behave in a competent, responsible and ethical manner with their clients.

TNP facilitators and coaches realise that their own unprocessed trauma or personal or professional insecurities could have a negative impact on professional activities and therefore have an awareness of how their own limitations can directly impact the quality of service they provide to their clients.

TNP facilitators and coaches are also aware that the skills they learn in their own quest for personal development can contribute to their professional development as well.

  1. TNP facilitators and coaches are committed to an ongoing personal program of development that integrates their physical, emotional, mental, spiritual and interpersonal well-being.
  2. TNP facilitators and coaches monitor the effects of their own physical health, emotional state and human needs and take the necessary steps to maximize their own physical, emotional, mental, social, financial, spiritual and environmental well-being.
  3. TNP facilitators and coaches have personally experienced the process and practices that they offer their clients and use their own experiences to inform themselves about the value, potential and limitations of specific techniques.
  4. TNP facilitators and coaches know their limitations as individuals and as facilitators and coaches and set their own boundaries accordingly with their clients, colleagues and community.
  5. TNP facilitators and coaches are open to feedback offered by clients, colleagues and mentors.
  1. TNP facilitators and coaches provide support only in areas where they have received education, training, supervised experience, or other study that qualifies them for providing those services. For example, while training in TNP offers facilitators and coaches tools for helping their clients deepen their relationship to nature and promote well-being it does not qualify a practitioner to provide services beyond the facilitation and coaching training.  It is the responsibility of the facilitator or to draw those lines professionally and appropriately.
  2. TNP facilitators and coaches provide information to prospective clients about their background with TNP and any other training they have.
  3. TNP facilitators and coaches stay in their current field of practise and develop their skillset through ongoing supervision, workshops and continuing education courses.
  4. TNP facilitators and coaches also receive continuing professional development (CPD) with regards to TNP to ensure they continue to develop their understanding and skills with TNP.
  5. TNP facilitators and coaches obtain the appropriate insurance and follow other ethical business practices.
  6. The integration of other practices, skillsets and training into TNP is allowed and encouraged, subject to the facilitator or coach’s competence and qualifications in these practices, skillsets and training.
  1. TNP facilitators and coaches provide clear information to prospective clients about the nature of their services and the practical aspects (including, but not limited to length and frequency of sessions, fees, cancellation policies) so that they can make an informed choice.
  2. TNP facilitators and coaches ensure that prospective clients understand and agree to the specifics outlined with regards to the services before providing TNP services.
  3. In deciding whether to offer TNP to those already receiving professional support for specific issues, TNP facilitators and coaches consider any issues and the prospective client’s well-being. They discuss these issues with the client so that the risk of confusion and conflict is minimized, consult with other service providers where appropriate and permission is granted from the client, and proceed with sensitivity and respect.
  1. TNP facilitators and coaches engage each client in identifying goals for the services sought and create a plan along with outcomes of working together.
  2. TNP clients are encourage to be pro-active about their own needs and take responsibility for their well-being choices.
  3. TNP facilitators and coaches may attempt to encourage, but they do not attempt to pressure or coerce a client into any action or belief, even if the practitioner believes such act or belief would be in the best interest of the client.
  4. TNP facilitators and coaches take time to understand each client’s hopes and expectations for using TNP and discuss any unrealistic expectations as soon as possible.
  5. TNP facilitators and coaches understand the challenges of being overly attached to the outcomes of the services they provide and recognize that trying too hard or becoming overly invested may result in the services offered not being in the client’s best interests.
  6. TNP facilitators and coaches have the right to refuse to work with any person seeking their services when they judge this to not be in the best interests of the client or a threat to their own personal safety.
  7. TNP facilitators and coaches consult with, refer to, or cooperate with other professionals with their clients’ consent provided this serves the best interests of their clients. TNP facilitators and coaches understand the boundaries and limitation of their services and make referrals accordingly.  They clearly communicate with clients about their level of personal knowledge of another practitioner and encourage clients to check out other facilitators and coaches before engaging their services.
  8. TNP facilitators and coaches provide a safe, warm, welcoming, supportive, appropriate and comfortable environment when working with clients both in person and online.
  9. TNP facilitators and coaches offer their undivided and uninterrupted attention to their client during a TNP session.
  10. TNP facilitators and coaches may use non-traditional ways of assessing a client’s well-being. They recognise, however, the limitations and subjective nature of such methods and acknowledge that non-traditional ways of assessing well-being do not replace physical or psychological diagnostic tests.
  11. TNP will always be offered by facilitators and coaches in a caring, considerate manner, with respect for the client’s well-being and natural attractions.
  12. TNP facilitators and coaches do not maintain a client relationship solely for financial reasons. However, they may terminate services with a client if the client is unable or unwilling to pay for the services agreed.  Prior to termination of services, the issues involved and possible alternatives are discussed with a view to offering potential alternatives moving forward, with the awareness that the client’s well-being is of highest priority.
  13. TNP facilitators and coaches attempt to resolve any ethical conflicts in a responsible manner that reduces the risk of harm and seek advice or supervision as appropriate.
  14. TNP facilitators and coaches end a client relationship when it becomes clear that the client no longer needs or is benefitting from the continued service.
  15. TNP facilitators and coaches may terminate a client relationship if they feel their physical safety is at risk.
  16. TNP facilitators and coaches continue to maintain client confidentiality after the services have ended.
  1. The client is the only person who has the right to determine who has access to any information the practitioner has. However, there are cases for exceptions:
    a. Disclosing information to prevent clear and imminent danger to the client or others;
    b. Information about the relationship may be disclosed if TNP practitioner is a defendant in a civil, criminal or disciplinary action as a result of the client relationship.
  2. TNP facilitators and coaches who work with the children of a client or more than one member of the same family (including “significant others”) establish with the relevant parties at the outset (or when new family members begin to receive services from the practitioner) the kinds of information that may be shared, and with whom, and the kinds of information that may not be shared by the practitioner. Services are provided to more than one member of a family only after weighing potential disadvantages, conflicts, and confidentiality issues.
  3. When consulting with colleagues, TNP facilitators and coaches do not disclose confidential information that reasonably could lead to the identification of a client with whom they have a confidential relationship unless they have obtained the prior consent of the person or the disclosure cannot be avoided. Agreement forms may include a stipulation that the practitioner can seek supervision or consultation about the client.
  4. Before recording the voices or images of individuals to whom they provide services, TNP facilitators and coaches obtain permission from all such persons, stating how the voices or images may be used.
  5. TNP facilitators and coaches do not disclose in their writings, lectures, or other public media, personally identifiable information concerning their clients, students, research participants, or other recipients of their services that they obtained during the course of their work unless 1) they take reasonable steps to disguise the recipient of service, 2) the recipient has consented in writing or in the recorded session, or 3) there is legal authorisation for doing so.
  1. TNP facilitators and coaches work to make sure that their personal biases, limits to their competence, and the limitations of their training do not negatively impact the services they provide to their clients.
  2. TNP facilitators and coaches ensure they understand their professional roles and obligations and work to manage any conflicts of interests to avoid exploitation or harm.
  3. TNP facilitators and coaches acknowledge that clear, compassionate communication is essential to providing the highest level of service possible and act accordingly.
  4. It’s possible that working with TNP may open issues that are private, delicate or embarrassing. TNP facilitators and coaches acknowledge their client’s right not to discuss these issues while ensuring that any discussion around these issues is conducted in a frank, professional, and respectful manner.
  5. Because TNP facilitators and coaches teach clients to deepen their relationship with nature, they acknowledge a special responsibility to ensure their own relationship with nature is maintained and deepened.
  6. TNP facilitators and coaches do not provide services under the influence of any medication, drug, substance, or state of mind that may impair their work.
  7. TNP facilitators and coaches are aware of the power dynamics within a client/practitioner relationship and ensure they do not exploit such differences during or after the professional relationship for the benefit or personal gratification of the practitioner.
  8. TNP facilitators and coaches explicitly obtain permission directly from the client prior to engaging in any “distant” or “remote” sessions or “connecting with nature on a client’s behalf” and they perform such services with the client’s well-being as their highest priority.
  9. TNP facilitators and coaches treat colleagues with dignity, respect, and courtesy; talk about colleagues in respectful ways; resist gossip; acknowledge colleagues for their contributions and innovations; and show respect for the teachings, teachers, mentors, facilitators and coaches before them.
  10. TNP facilitators and coaches do not enter into dual relationships (e.g. being in a professional role with a person and at the same time having another role such as friend, colleague or having a relationship with a person closely related to the person that the practitioner has a professional relationship with) that have the potential to impair the practitioner’s objectivity, competence, or effectiveness in facilitating or coaching TNP or otherwise risks exploitation or harm to the person with whom the professional relationship exists.
  11. Dual relationships that do not have the potential to cause impairment or risk or exploitation or harm are not unethical. Nevertheless, it is the responsibility of the practitioner to ensure that each party is aware of issues related to shifting between the client-practitioner setting and the social setting of the personal relationship.  These issues should be discussed with the client and take precedence in decisions about the dual relationship.
  12. If a TNP practitioner realizes that, due to unforeseen factors, a potentially harmful dual relationship has arisen, the practitioner takes reasonable steps to resolve it with due regard for the best interests of the affected person and ensures any decisions taken are in line with the Ethics Code for The Nature Process Facilitators and Coaches.
  13. Should TNP facilitators and coaches be required by law, institutional policy, or extraordinary circumstances to serve in more than one role in judicial or administrative proceedings, they must clarify role expectations and the extent of confidentiality as early as possible.
  14. TNP facilitators and coaches are not allowed to develop any kind of romantic or sexual relationship with any client while providing services. This dual relationship is unacceptable.
  15. TNP facilitators and coaches do not engage in sexual relations with a former client for at least a full year after the end of the client relationship, and only then after a good faith determination through appropriate consultation with a professional colleague that there is no exploitation of the former client.
  16. TNP facilitators and coaches model respect and tolerance in all their work-related activities and do not permit or engage in harassment or demeaning behaviour towards others or discriminate based on age, gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, culture, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, or socioeconomic status. TNP facilitators and coaches do, however, reserve the right to refuse service to anyone the practitioner feels may compromise their safety.
  17. TNP facilitators and coaches do not engage in sexual harassment. Sexual harassment includes sexual solicitation, physical advances, verbal or nonverbal conduct that is sexual in nature, that occurs in connection with the practitioner’s professional role or activities and that is 1) unwelcome, offensive, or creates an objectionable interpersonal atmosphere and the practitioner has been informed of this, or 2) sufficiently severe or intense to be considered abusive to a reasonable person in the context.  Sexual harassment can consist of a single severe act or of persistent multiple acts of less intensity.  This applies to all professional settings. Refer to Section 11 below, Resolving Ethical Issues.
  1. TNP facilitators and coaches document informed consent to engage in services from all clients.  This can be done in a variety of ways from email confirmation of services with all details covered to a signed coaching agreement.  It’s the responsibility of the facilitator or coach to determine which way of informed consent is most appropriate.
  2. TNP facilitators and coaches use their own professional judgement on the kinds of intake information, assessments, interventions and session-by-session outcomes they record and maintain in a client’s file.
  3. Any client records are kept in a safe and secure place by TNP facilitators and coaches.
  4. TNP facilitators and coaches ensure that any client notes/records may only be used for research purposes with the client’s written consent or with pertinent identifying personal information removed or adequately disguised.
  5. TNP facilitators and coaches maintain session records, if they are licensed in an allied profession, in the manner required by that particular profession.
  6. TNP facilitators and coaches are aware of and follow any relevant laws and regulations regarding a client’s rights to obtain his or her TNP notes/records.
Public statements include but are not limited to paid or unpaid advertising, product endorsement, grant applications, licensing applications, other credentialing applications, brochures, printed matter, websites, directory listings, personal resumes or curricula vitae, or comments for use in media such as print or electronic transmission statements in legal proceedings, lectures and public oral presentations, and published materials.

  1. TNP facilitators and coaches help clients and the general public in developing informed judgments concerning the benefits of connecting with nature.
  2. Public statements, whether intended for informational or advertising purposes, should be submitted to and evaluated by The Nature Process team for any unintended impact before being released.
  3. TNP facilitators and coaches use clear, accessible language in their advertisements, and their advertisements are honest and representative of the services they can deliver.
  4. TNP facilitators and coaches do not make false, deceptive, or fraudulent statements concerning 1) their training, experience, or competence; 2) their academic degrees; 3) their credentials; 4) their institutional or association affiliations; 5) their services; 6) the scientific or clinical basis for, or results or degree of success of their services; 7) their fees; or 8) their publications or research findings.
  5. TNP facilitators and coaches do not make public statements that use sensationalism or that prey on the public’s vulnerability to irrational fears and anxieties.
  6. TNP facilitators and coaches who engage others to create or place public statements that promote their professional practice, products, or activities retain professional responsibility for such statements.
  7. TNP facilitators and coaches do not compensate employees of press, radio, television, or other communication media in return for publicity in a news item.
  8. TNP facilitators and coaches connected to the development or promotion of products disclose any vested interest when informing clients or students about such products and ensure that such products are presented in a factual and professional manner.
  9. Any paid advertising related to a TNP facilitator or coach’s activities or products must be identified or clearly recognisable as such.
  10. TNP facilitators and coaches are responsible for ensuring that announcements, catalogues, brochures, or advertisements describing workshops, seminars, or other educational programs accurately describe The Nature Process in accordance with the guidelines provided by The Nature Process Ltd and accurately describe the audience for which the program is intended, the educational objectives, the presenters, and the fees involved.
  11. When TNP facilitators and coaches provide public advice or comment via radio, television, print, or internet, they take precautions to ensure that statements are based on their professional knowledge, training, or experience.
  12. If TNP facilitators and coaches learn of the misuse or misrepresentation of their work, they take reasonable steps to correct or minimize the misuse or misrepresentation.
  1. TNP facilitators and coaches responsible for educational programs or presentations take reasonable steps to ensure that the programs are designed to provide the appropriate knowledge and proper experiences and to fulfil the goals of the presentation or programs. This may require that the facilitator or coach has acquired experience or training in curriculum design and presentation methods.
  2. TNP facilitators and coaches responsible for educational programs or presentations take reasonable steps to ensure the ready availability of accurate descriptions (provided by The Nature Process Ltd) of the program content, goals, benefits, costs, prerequisites, and any special requirements that must be met for satisfactory completion of the program.
  3. TNP facilitators and coaches recognise the capabilities and limitations of their audiences and structure their presentations accordingly.
  4. TNP facilitators and coaches give credit to other methods, theories, or research being taught as part of TNP.
  5. TNP facilitators and coaches share any relevant applications of the methods and concepts presented, including their limitations and risks.
  6. TNP facilitators and coaches ensure the well-being of any volunteers for experiential activities beyond the presentation itself and take reasonable steps to ensure that volunteers who take part in experiential activities will not be harmed.
  7. TNP facilitators and coaches provide follow-up for any immediate distress that arises during or as a consequence of an experiential activity and offer an appropriate referral. There is no charge for a follow-up in this circumstance.
  8. TNP facilitators and coaches who show video or audio tapes of their work are responsible for acquiring the informed consent of those being portrayed.
  9. TNP facilitators and coaches do not provide experiential activities, live, on video, or online, that are not in the best interests of the participants.
  10. Any TNP facilitators and coaches who offer their own training programs actively plan to make sure that graduates of their programs represent the training received appropriately and with an understanding of the limitations as well as the potentials of the skills their students have developed.
  11. TNP facilitators and coaches engaged in formal supervision of TNP students establish a timely and specific process for providing feedback to those they supervise and information regarding this process is established at the beginning of the supervision.
  12. TNP facilitators and coaches do not enter into sexual or romantic relationships with students in their classes and do not engage in sexual or romantic relationships with those they supervise or for whom they have evaluative responsibilities during the time they are engaged in this teaching/mentoring/supervisory role.
  1. When TNP facilitators and coaches believe there may have been an ethical violation by another TNP facilitator or coach, they attempt to resolve the issue by bringing it to the attention of that individual if an information resolution appears possible and appropriate. Such interventions may not, however, violate any confidentiality rights that are involved.
  2. If an apparent ethical violation has substantially harmed or is likely to substantially harm a person or organisation and is not appropriate for informal resolution as described above, or is not adequately resolved in that fashion, TNP facilitators and coaches take further action relevant to the circumstances in consultation with TNP core team.
  3. TNP facilitators and coaches do not attempt to harass, intimidate, or manipulate any person who brings a grievance before TNP core team.
  4. TNP facilitators and coaches cooperate in formal ethics investigations, proceedings, and determinations, and they submit relevant information as requested by any authorised ethics committee. While complying with these guidelines, they appropriately address confidentiality issues.  Failing to cooperate with an ethics investigation is itself an ethics violation.
  5. TNP facilitators and coaches show respect for various personalities, rhythms, representational styles, educational levels and backgrounds and do not falsely harm the reputation of their colleagues.
Acknowledgements

In developing The NatureProcess Code of Ethics we drew heavily on Ethics Code for Energy Healing Practitioners and were also guided by the British Psychological Society’s ethical values of respect, competence, responsibility and integrity.